Everyday vs. Every Day: What's the Difference Image

Some words look very similar, but are spelled a little differently, like compliment and complement. Others sound the same, like their and they’re, but have completely different meanings.

And some words are spelled and pronounced exactly the same, but are separated only by small details, like a space.

Everyday and every day are two such words. Although many people use these two words interchangeably, they actually serve 2 very different purposes.

The Difference Between Everyday vs. Every Day

Though they’re separated only by a space, every day and everyday are not interchangeable, and in fact constitute two totally different words.

Read on to learn more about the difference between the adjective everyday and the adverbial phrase every day.

Definition of “Everyday”

“Everyday” is used as an adjective to describe an occurrence that is recurring or typical. For example, the phrase “my everyday interactions” describes my interactions that take place on a regular basis.

Examples of “Everyday” in a Sentence

  • My everyday clothes are quite casual.
  • Her everyday diet consists mostly of fruits, vegetables, and proteins.
  • These are my everyday shoes; they’re very comfortable.
  • For everyday use, this jacket is practical.
  • Everyday people have a hard time relating to the candidate.

Definition of “Every Day”

“Every day,” on the other hand, is an adverbial phrase that simply means “each day,” like in the sentence “I go to the gym every day.”

The word “every,” as it is used here, could precede pretty much any noun. For example, the phrases “every person,” “every home,” and “every evening” are formed in exactly the same way as “every day.”

Examples of “Every Day” in a Sentence

  • I go to the gym every day.
  • Every day, my commute takes about 45 minutes.
  • He drinks two cups of coffee every day.
  • I attend classes every day.
  • He calls his mother every day.

Everyday Questions

Once you understand everyday and every day as 2 different parts of speech, you’ll be better able to remember the difference and use each properly in your writing.

Avoiding common grammatical errors—like the confusion of everyday and every day—will help you to write more effectively and make a better impression for your readers.

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Kaelyn Barron

As a blog writer for TCK Publishing, Kaelyn loves crafting fun and helpful content for writers, readers, and creative minds alike. She has a degree in International Affairs with a minor in Italian Studies, but her true passion has always been writing. Working from home allows her to do even more of the things she loves, like traveling, cooking, and spending time with her family.